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Free Software Free Society Selected Essays Of Richard Stallman

Publication date 2010

Topics 2010, Free Software, Free Society, GNU, FSF, GNU/Linux, selected essays, Lawrence Lessig, essays, Richard M. Stallman, RMS, Richard Stallman, Stallman, GPL, GPLv3, hacker, Gnu's Not Unix, operating system, Free speech, freedom, free as in freedom, libre, programming, programmers, copyleft, liberty, proprietary software, Microsoft, patents, patent law, software patents

PublisherGNU Press

Collectionopensource

Free Software, Free Society: Selected Essays of Richard M. Stallman collects the writing of Richard M. Stallman. Essays contained in this book deal mainly about ethics, law, business and their application to computer software. The introduction is written by Lawrence Lessig, professor at Harvard Law School.


The book is divided into seven main parts:


The GNU Project and Free Software

What's in a Name?

Copyright, Copyleft

Software Patents: Danger to Programmers

The Licences

Traps and Challenges

An Assessment and a Look Ahead



The first edition was published in 2002 by GNU Press under the GNU Free Documentation License. The second one, published in 2010, contains both updated versions of the original essays and many new essays.

Notes

Country USA
Language: English
Publisher: GNU Press
ISBN: 978-0-9831592-0-9

This collection includes historical writings such as The GNU Manifesto, which defined and launched the activist Free Software Movement, along with new writings on hot topics in copyright, patent law, and the controversial issue of "trusted computing."
Stallman takes a critical look at common abuses of copyright law and
patents when applied to computer software programs, and

This collection includes historical writings such as The GNU Manifesto, which defined and launched the activist Free Software Movement, along with new writings on hot topics in copyright, patent law, and the controversial issue of "trusted computing."
Stallman takes a critical look at common abuses of copyright law and
patents when applied to computer software programs, and how these
abuses damage our entire society and remove our existing freedoms. He
also discusses the social aspects of software and how free software
can create community and social justice.




Given the current turmoil in copyright and patent laws, including
the DMCA and proposed CBDTPA, these essays are more relevant than
ever. Stallman tackles head-on the essential issues driving the
current changes in copyright law. He argues that for creativity to
flourish, software must be free of inappropriate and overly-broad
legal constraints. Over the past twenty years his arguments and
actions have changed the course of software history; this new book is
sure to impact the future of software and legal policies in the years
to come.




Lawrence Lessig, the author of two well-known books on similar topics,
writes the introduction. He is a noted legal expert on copyright law
and a Stanford Law School professor.